Bologna

“Surge nel chiaro inverno la fosca turrita Bologna,
e il colle sopra bianco di neve ride.
È l’ora soave che il sol morituro saluta
le torri e ’l tempio, divo Petronio, tuo”
— Giosuè Carducci, Nella Piazza di San Petronio.

Bologna is the capital and largest city of the Emilia-Romagna Region in Northern Italy. It is the seventh most populous city in Italy, at the heart of a metropolitan area of about one million people.

Of Etruscan origin, the city has been a major urban centre for centuries, first under the Etruscans, then under the Romans (Bononia), then again in the Middle Ages, as a free municipality and signoria, when it was among the largest European cities by population. Famous for its towers, churches and lengthy porticoes, Bologna has a well-preserved historical centre, thanks to a careful restoration and conservation policy which began at the end of the 1970s. Home to the oldest university in the world the University of Bologna, established in AD 1088, the city has a large student population that gives it a cosmopolitan character. In 2000 it was declared European capital of culture and in 2006, a UNESCO “City of Music” and became part of the Creative Cities Network.

No more than twenty medieval defensive towers remain out of up to 180 that were built in the 12th and 13th centuries before the arrival of unified civic government. The most famous of the towers of Bologna are the central “Due Torri” (Asinelli and Garisenda), whose iconic leaning forms provide a popular symbol of the town.

The Portico di San Luca is possibly the world’s longest. It connects Porta Saragozza (one of the twelve gates of the ancient walls built in the Middle Ages, which circled a 7.5 km (4.7 mi) part of the city) with the Sanctuary of the Madonna di San Luca, a church begun in 1723 on the site of an 11th-century edifice which had already been enlarged in the 14th century, prominently located on a hill (289 metres (948 feet)) overlooking the town, which is one of Bologna’s main landmarks. The windy 666 vault arcades, almost four kilometres (3,796 m or 12,454 ft) long, effectively links San Luca, as the church is commonly called, to the city centre.

source: Wikipedia

All pictures and images on this site (except where explicitly stated) are ©2019 Stefano Guidetti.

Some content taken from Wikipedia (see attribution at the bottom of the post/page).
Some graphics for the home page and pages header taken from Pixabay.

If you would like to reuse any of my pictures, please contact me at info@sguidetti.net

On this site we do not use profiling cookies or third parties cookies.
We do, however, use technical cookies functional to to the fruition of this site.

Privacy Policy

About me

Stefano Guidetti

Very picky IT Manager, Web Developer, Web Designer and (very) amateur photographer.
Currently employed in the educational field, working for the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research.

(please note: social profiles are in Italian language only)